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WaterFluvanna’s Zion Crossroads area will not have water from the James River this year after all.

A necessary permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for the James River Water Authority (JRWA) project has not arrived. The expected completion date of the project has now shifted back a year from the end of 2018 to the end of 2019, said County Administrator Steve Nichols. 

The JRWA project, a joint venture between Fluvanna and Louisa Counties, consists of a water intake facility on the Point of Fork where the James and Rivanna Rivers meet near Columbia, and a raw water pipeline stretching a little over a mile to Route 6.

From that point, the Louisa County Water Authority will construct its own pipeline at its own expense to funnel water northwest through Fluvanna to Louisa County. Louisa has agreed to “make all reasonable efforts” to provide up to 400,000 gallons of treated water per day to Fluvanna’s Zion Crossroads area by the end of 2018.

But the historic nature of Point of Fork, on which the intake facility will be built, has complicated the issue and delayed the issuance of a permit necessary for construction.
Point of Fork housed Rassawek, the capital city of the Monacan Indians, and a Revolutionary War arsenal. Several Fluvanna residents have expressed the belief that Native American artifacts will be disturbed or destroyed by construction on the site.

Point of Fork’s history has necessitated a so-called Section 106 review before USACE can issue a permit for construction of the water intake facility.
“Section 106 of the historic resources federal law basically states that we have to evaluate any impact to historic resources if there’s a federal undertaking, and that includes if there’s a federal permit,” said Patrick Bloodgood, USACE spokesperson.

“They are going through what they call a Phase 1 archaeological investigation on the project site to see what exactly is out there that they’re going to encounter,” Bloodgood said. “We are working in coordination with the historical preservation office as well as different consulting parties.” 

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Linda StaigerRetired orthopedic surgeon and oil painter Linda Staiger spoke to members of the Fluvanna Art Association (FAA) at their monthly meeting Jan. 19 about her artist’s journey, her painting process and how to create good compositions from photos.

Staiger is passionate about painting landscapes and expressing her love for the natural environment through her artistic approach. Growing up on a farm in Fluvanna reminded Staiger of what keeps her painting. Her favorite subjects are the area’s rivers and woods.

“When I was in college and later studying medicine, I would go to museums,” she said. “I was always fascinated by the variety of artists and wondered how they did what they did.” This is a method that many artists learning about art employ. It can be useful to deconstruct great works in order to have a better understanding of their meaning and composition.

For the last 15 years, Staiger returned to art, taking classes at Piedmont Virginia Community College, including graphic arts and ceramics. Later she attended workshops at The Beverly Street Studio and McGuffey Arts Center, where she studied with artist Rick Weaver. 

“He was a very cerebral artist. Many artists cannot explain the how and why of art,” she said. She then listed the key points of painting: “The formal elements are lines and colors; what is the subject; what is it about.” Add a comment

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Lake Monticello police to enforce low-level speeding

Drivers, beware. Exceeding Lake Monticello’s 25 miles per hour (mph) speed limit could soon result in a $50 fine.

Currently, the Lake Monticello Police Department (LMPD) only issues Fluvanna County traffic citations for drivers caught going 39 mph or above. 

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Two defendants plead guilty in 2016 shootout

Two men charged in a 2016 attempted robbery and gunfight at a private garage off Lake Monticello Road entered guilty pleas to multiple felony charges in Fluvanna County Circuit Court on Thursday (Jan. 18). 

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The Board of Supervisors met all day Saturday (Jan. 20) to hash out Fluvanna County’s direction moving forward into 2018.

Sitting in the new Lake Monticello Volunteer Fire Department building, supervisors pored over two lengthy lists: their strategic initiatives and their goals from the 2015 iteration of the county’s Comprehensive Plan.
Rather than taking concrete actions reserved for regular Wednesday meetings, supervisors spent their time reworking the lists: removing items deemed to be complete, adding tasks that have arisen over the past year, and tweaking plans that need further attention.

Master water and sewer plan
Developing a master water and sewer plan for Fluvanna County needs to be the Board’s top utilities goal for the year, said Wayne Stephens, director of public works.

Supervisor goals called for providing water and sewer to the county’s community planning areas (CPAs), but Stephens said the language was too vague. Instead, supervisors need to come up with an actual plan as to how to accomplish that task, he said – an undertaking that will require significant study.

“Until we have some serious looking into the topography and the geographic layout of our CPAs, and have somebody looking at how you would provide water and sewer on such and such a road… Until you start generally mapping some of that stuff out, you’re not really going to know how much it’s going to cost to provide water and sewer to a certain area,” Stephens said.

The county has undertaken two major water projects: the James River Water Authority, which will pipe water from the James River through Louisa to Zion Crossroads, and the Zion Crossroads water system, which will take water from the women’s prison on Route 250 and route it to the Zion Crossroads area. Add a comment

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