Fluvanna Review

Maria Carter won first place in the oil/acrylic category for Field of Flowers Photo by Page H. GiffordTrilbie Knap, a watercolorist from Charlottesville was the judge for the Fluvanna Art Association’s annual juried show. The show, currently at the Fluvanna County Library through December, features some striking works by members.

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Volunteer Ralph Davidson brings meals to Mildred Bennett. Photo by George BabcockThe Dogwood Restaurant saved the day for Fluvanna’s Meals on Wheels (MOW) and its hungry clients.
In the past, Jefferson Area Board for Aging (JABA) provided hot dinners to MOW, delivering them right to the doorstep of Effort Church where volunteers stood ready to package them up and send them off throughout the county.
But due to increased demand on JABA’s kitchen operations, the organization told MOW it wouldn’t be able to provide meals as of Jan. 1.
“It caused us quite a scramble. It was a panic,” said Lisa Himes, chair of the MOW board. “We had to find somebody that could not only prepare that many meals but could deliver the food to us.”
Fluvanna’s MOW brings hot meals to 72 clients throughout the county five days a week. Cooking that much food is no small task.
But during a lunch at the Dogwood, Himes spoke with co-owner Mike Hartling, and he jumped on board. The Dogwood now whips up 72 meals a day, five days a week, and delivers them to Effort.
“We’ve had an outpouring of comments from clients noticing a huge difference in the food quality,” said Himes. “They like it better. Before, the food was coming from Charlottesville. Now it’s arriving from five minutes away. Plus, the Dogwood is cooking for 72 clients, whereas JABA was preparing for a large number for all their programs.”
The hot meals include meat, starch, vegetables, fruit, or milk in a varying menu, said Himes.
“We got out of the cafeteria-style food and made it more quality, made-to-order food,” said Hartling. “We recently made chicken piccata and pork marsala. JABA was forced to cook for a huge number. We are able to come up with fresher products.”
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This FlucoFinder column’s goal is to share with the community, information about the schools. Here you will find news of events and activities of public interest, with details and contact information. The FlucoFinder logo was designed by Brendan Murray, a 2013 Fluvanna County High School graduate.
Fluvanna High School
• Ongoing: Mr. David Small’s TV production group will be producing and taping sporting events at School Board meetings for viewing on Charlottesville public access channel 14 and on Lake Monticello’s channel 977.

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Land use suddenly became a hot topic in Fluvanna County last month, when Supervisor Tony O’Brien started pushing his fellow Board members to examine the program more closely.
Land use is a program adopted by the Board of Supervisors and administered by Commissioner of the Revenue Mel Sheridan. It encourages open space, agriculture and forestry by giving significant tax breaks to landowners who use their properties in those ways.
But the tax breaks from land use cost the county $2.7 million in 2015. O’Brien wants to take a closer look at land use, especially by gathering more data, to see if tweaks or an overhaul of the program are in order.
The key distinction between O’Brien and the other supervisors is that he is the only one without any property in land use. Whether his status as land use outsider helps or hinders his quest to probe into the program depends on who’s doing the talking.
Trish Eager
Supervisor Trish Eager far and away surpasses her colleagues on the Board in Fluvanna County land holdings with 829 acres. Though some of her parcels are residential and therefore don’t qualify for the program, other holdings are tucked away in land use. Land use saved Eager a whopping $28,515 in 2015 taxes.
But Eager noted that when she pulled six acres out of land use to sell them last winter, she paid $10,000 in rollback taxes to the county. When a parcel no longer qualifies for land use, the owner must pay the preceding five years’ worth of rollback taxes, or the difference between what she actually paid in taxes and what she would have paid if the land were not in land use.
“The reason we have land use is so that we can hold onto large parcels of land and not develop them,” said Eager. “Without that I’m afraid our county would look very different. Without this type of program, I wouldn’t be able to have the farm that I have. I think there are some misconceptions about land use. With rollback taxes – it’s not like the county doesn’t reclaim some of the money. And we pay taxes on any of our improvements [such as houses] just like anybody else does.”
Don Weaver
A distant second, Supervisor Don Weaver owns 80 acres in Fluvanna. Land use saved him $1,995 in 2015 taxes.
“Land use keeps Fluvanna rural,” Weaver said. “I don’t really understand why people have a problem with that. They moved here and I think they enjoy the farmland.”
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Fluvanna High School was named a silver medal winner in the U.S. News and World Reports 2016 ranking of the Best High Schools In America. Principal James Barlow is celebrating the win – but he is not satisfied.
“I would love to get the gold - that’s the bottom line,” said Barlow with a smile. “I want Fluvanna High School to be in the top ten schools in the state.”
“Getting a gold medal would be really difficult,” said Fluvanna Schools’ Director of Curriculum and Instruction Brenda Gilliam, “but we are still working for it. Only 500 schools in the country earn gold medals,” she said.
The ranking is made using a complicated calculation that includes graduation rates, SOL scores, the size of the achievement gap for economically disadvantaged students, and scores on AP tests. Fluvanna High School was ranked number 50 in the Commonwealth. More than half of the schools in the top 50 are located in Northern Virginia; almost all of the rest are in the Richmond and Tidewater areas. No other school in this area won a gold or silver rank.
“I’m just really proud of them,” said Gilliam. “The high school gets awards because it is the culminating thing, but this is really an award for everybody, all the way through. Once you strengthen the curriculum at the lower grades you see the results at the high school. I am just really proud of all of our students and staff.”
Gilliam said they focus on offering AP (Advanced Placement) classes. “There are AP classes in things like world geography, and statistics,” Gilliam said. “These are not easy courses.” She added that the school system has been working to make the AP classes more broadly accessible and credits that work with helping secure the silver medal.
“Taking AP classes and success in AP is not decided when they walk through the doors of the high school,” said Gilliam. “It really starts in kindergarten. That is why we are continuously looking at the curriculum in the lower grades and increasing the rigor of those courses and encouraging the students to take these more challenging classes. It takes a lot of preparation.”
Barlow credits his administrative staff, school staff, and the students themselves with the school’s success. “This is our third silver medal,” he said. “I think this one means more to me, because one year we did not get any medal. This is getting back into the ballgame.”
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