Fluvanna Review

Day campThe Fluvanna County Parks and Recreation Department has a number of summer camp programs. The Equus Springs Farm Day Camp is one of them. Two week-long camps are offered for anyone from age 8 to adults. The first camp was held in June and the second will be held July 24-28. July 21 is the last day to register. These are full-day camps that run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Drop-off is allowed as early as 7:30 a.m. and pick-up is allowed until 4:30 p.m. Equus Springs Farm is located on Ruritan Lake Road in the Scottsville area of Fluvanna. Heather Antonacci, who owns the farm, is the instructor.

The idea of the camp is to give the participants somewhat of a full immersion experience in what is involved in running a working horse farm. The parks and recreation brochure says, “Participants will be actively involved in the daily routine of running a horse farm; learning by doing and getting dirty.” This statement is in bold lettering in the brochure, so they want people to know that the farm day camp is not just an academic endeavor. The program is designed to show participants what it is really like to own and care for a horse. Add a comment

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Dakota Rigsby may be getting a post office named in his honor.

Less than a month after Rigsby, 19, died in an accident aboard the USS Fitzgerald off the coast of Japan, Representative Tom Garrett (R-5th District) has introduced House Resolution 3183 to designate “the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 13683 James Madison Highway in Palmyra, Va., as the ‘U.S. Navy Seaman Dakota Kyle Rigsby Post Office.’”

There are more than 31,000 post offices in the United States and the vast majority of them are unnamed. Bills to dedicate them in honor of notable local residents have mushroomed in recent years. According the Congressional Research Service, at least 20 percent of all public laws passed by Congress are naming bills. 

The process, while simple, can take several months to complete. Garrett’s bill has already been referred to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. Once approved by the committee, it will be sent to the House for a simple voice or roll call vote before heading to the Senate, where it will likely pass by unanimous consent.

The local post office will later dedicate a small place somewhere in the lobby saying the building had been named after Rigsby by an act of Congress.

Garrett has also submitted a bill to name a post office on the University of Virginia (U.Va.) campus in honor of Captain Humayun Khan, the U.Va. alumnus who was killed in Iraq in 2004. The congressman’s office said in a press release that both the Rigsby and Khan families approved the bills.

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altWith a new round of Aqua Virginia rate hikes on the horizon, the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) is moving fast to minimize the impact on area residents.

Within 24 hours of learning about Aqua’s proposed 7.4 percent rate increase, the LMOA Board of Directors voted to form an ad hoc committee to organize the community’s response. Board President Rich Barringer will serve as liaison to the committee. Former Board member Mike Harrison will serve as committee chair. 

About 15 members of the community met with Harrison at Fairway Clubhouse Thursday night (Sept. 14) to learn more about the plan of attack and decide if they wanted to join the committee.

“The chances of us eliminating the rate increase is exactly zero, but we can probably reduce it,” Harrison said.

Aqua’s rate case brings back the water and wastewater infrastructure service charge (WWISC), which was denied by the State Corporation Committee (SCC) in 2015. The additional charge, which could be as high as 10 percent of the average customer bill, would be used to fund capital improvements. Harrison said he believes the community can fight the implementation of WWISC.

Harrison outlined the series of steps the committee will have to take between now and May 2018.

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Frances HillFrancis Hill, 92, sat outside on her swing waiting for me to arrive.

She is bright and full of life. In spite of having to use a cane because she can’t trust her left knee not to give out, she looks far younger than her age. She and her husband live with their grandson in Bremo Bluff.

How long have you lived in Fluvanna?
All my life. I was born here. I started school at [age] 7. West Bottom. I had to walk three miles every day rain or shine. My grandma wouldn’t let me stay at home. My grandma raised me. I never knew my mother. She died when I was a baby. My father’s mother raised me. My father’s name is George Armstrong. My mother’s name was Margaret.

Tell me about your family.
I had 11 children; six boys and five girls…I didn’t go to the hospital for any of them. Miss Murry Scott was my midwife. My husband, Bennie Hill, Sr., worked at Farmington Country Club. I don’t know what he did there. At one time I think he worked construction. My kids live all over. Some in New Jersey. Some in Atlanta.  One lives in Short Pump.
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AntiquesSteve Sylvia traces his interest in the Civil War to his childhood, sparked by his brother’s help reading Shelby Foote’s Shiloh.


But it was a belt buckle that belonged to a long-forgotten Union soldier that may have been the catalyst for a life-long involvement in the history of this nation’s defining conflict, a career writing about Civil War relics, and even appearances on segments of the PBS series Antiques Roadshow.


Following graduation from the University of Maryland’s journalism program and a couple years performing and traveling with a rock and roll band, Sylvia found himself in search of opportunity.


“I had a gal singing for me in 1972. The band broke up. I’m running out of money and she says, ‘My boyfriend is looking for someone in public relations,’” Sylvia said.


“I walked into the interview with her boyfriend and I was wearing a U.S. buckle I had dug. His eyes were riveted on my buckle.”


Their common interest in the Civil War made them good friends and ultimately led to the opportunity for Sylvia to turn that interest into a life-long career.


“‘Did you dig that?’” the man inquired of the buckle.

“Yes, I did,” replied Sylvia. “I dug it at Chancellorsville.”
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